Google marks World Wide Web’s 30th year with doodle

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First Published 12, Mar 2019, 11:14 AM IST
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Google marks World Wide Web 30th year with doodle
Highlights

Sir Tim Berners-Lee, in 1989, submitted the 'Information Management: A Proposal' to his boss in the CERN lab. Though Lee’s boss said that the idea was “vague and but exciting’, he gave him time to develop the flow chart into a working model. The web was made public in April 1993 and the rest is history.
 

New Delhi: Google on Tuesday introduced a doodle to mark the 30 years of the World Wide Web —- a network of online content, commonly known as Web.

Sir Tim Berners-Lee, in 1989, submitted the 'Information Management: A Proposal' to his boss in the CERN lab 

Though Lee’s boss said that the idea was “vague and but exciting’, he gave him time to develop the flow chart into a working model. The web was made public in April 1993 and the rest is history.

Lee recently said that he is on a mission to fix the problems of online abuse, misinformation and data protection that were not envisioned when the system was created. 

The British computer scientist said his efforts focus on two areas -- the so-called "Contract for the Web" to ensure integrity of online information, and his platform in development called "Solid" to give users control of their data. 

Lee stepped up his call to join the "contract," a project unveiled last November, that would bring together governments, tech firms and others to establish principles for online governance.

"You can't just outlaw fake news, it's much more complicated," he said in an on-stage interview at the Post headquarters.

"The Contract for the Web is about locking in a midcourse correction, a change of momentum, back toward constructivism, back toward science, facts." 

The creator of WWW said that he had launched the Solid project in response to concerns about personal data being bought and sold without the consent of users.

He said the platform aims "to separate the apps from the data storage" so users can decide where and how they would share their personal information.

"Solid is going to be a ubiquitous data storage system that will give people control of their data," he said.

With agency inputs 

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